Welcome to the Postural Integration Association of Southern Africa (PIASA)

What is PI about? If you ask somebody who just started receiving PI sessions, they would be able to wax lyrical with enthusiasm. If you ask someone who has been involved with the process and matured into it, they are with full confidence able to say “I don’t know” or “I cannot explain it”, “it works – go and do it”.

The “I don’t know” is what PI is about. The ability to “not have to know” is what PI supports in an integrating body-mind. As this “not knowing” develops, the integrating body mind is able to engage with more.

We're excited you're here. It is no exaggeration to say Postural Integration can be a life-changing technique. Learning more about it and becoming involved will enhance your journey of powerful personal self-exploration and transformation. 

Our qualified Postural Integrators are highly skilled facilitators of self-exploration, employing a body-mind awakening and integrating approach.

The effectiveness of this technique comes from the simultaneous use of the four pillars of PI in each appointment: For more information on PI worldwide, please check the website of the International Council of Psycho-Corporal (Body-Mind) Integration Trainers (ICPIT) www.icpit.org

Do I need PI?

Are you experiencing any of the following that mainstream medicine and other treatments have been unable to treat?
  • Chronic pain?
  • Finding that you are stuck in repetitive behavioural patterns – such as money, relationships, family, homelife?
  • Repetitive sport or strain injuries?
  • The inability to express emotion with words?
  • Are you overwhelmed with your agitation and dissatisfaction?
  • Have hunched or stooping shoulders?
  • Flat feet, ankle, knee, hip, shoulder problems?
  • The bottom part of your body is disproportionate to the upper part of your body or visa versa?
  • Symptoms of chronic or long terms post-traumatic stress such as dry mouth, anxiety, sweating & heart palpitations, sleeplessness, nightmares and depression?
YES. If you answered yes to any one of the above questions, PI can assist.
PI is a stand-alone modality yet works very well with mainstream medicine and other modalities & treatments.



Frequently Asked Questions

What is Postural Integration (PI)?

Postural Integration is “postural” as it is a way of bringing the posture into alignment by releasing deep-seated tension held in the body’s muscles, as well as stimulating muscles with poor tone. It also calls for an “integration” of all the wisdom available from a person’s heart, mind, spirit and body so that emotional turmoil and feelings of dissatisfaction can be transformed into a sense of wellbeing and empowerment.

What techniques does PI use?

The work combines structural deep tissue bodywork, psychodynamic techniques and breathwork.

Deep tissue bodywork: The facilitator uses weight bearing techniques with their arms and hands to shift the tension in the muscular structure.
The extraordinary power of Postural Integration lies in the willingness of client and facilitator to work on many levels simultaneously.

Psychodynamic: The work combines the structural bodywork and the psychodynamic techniques such as Gestalt, deep listening and reflection, mirroring and other skills that the individual facilitator can bring to the work.

Breathwork: A body-mind shapes itself according to its relationship with breathing. Depending on whether we want to be vital or withdrawn, we shape our breath to meet that need. The breath will show the facilitator where the healthy and unhealthy armour is.

What will happen in a PI session?

After the initial assessment, the facilitator will guide the client through a 1½ hour (depending on the facilitator) process in which the client is encouraged to explore new physical movements, breathe more freely, express blocked emotions and discover unconscious self-limiting beliefs in a safe environment.

“This unique and unified style of deep work is unusually powerful in transforming the whole person.” Jack Painter, Founder of PI

How many sessions will I need?

10 Sessions are recommended to complete the Postural Integration process; however, it can take an individual one appointment to numerous appointments to complete one session. The client is always in control of booking the sessions according to their schedule and pace and can stop when they need to.

Time?

The time commitment is client dependent.

We would recommend that a person who starts a PI process completes up to at least a 3rd session. After that the client will have a very good idea of what PI is about and if it is something that they would want to continue with. That being the case, it is then recommended that the client completes all 10 session.

Costs?

Cost is subject to the facilitator

What training do PI Facilitators have?

Certification as a Postural Integrator is awarded by the International Council of Psycho-Corporal (Body-Mind) Integration Trainers (ICPIT) after successful completion of above a minimum standard of 700 hours of theoretical studies, practical work and case studies.

Can PI help with self-development?

YES

Does PI help with addiction?

Not all facilitators are prepared to work with addicts but the ones that do will insist on working in conjunction with a rehabilitation programme.

What is psycho-somatic support?

Definition: relating to the interaction of mind and body.

Where other treatments are unable to fully resolve a health issue PI, stand-alone or in collaboration, can be what shifts that psychosomatic issue.

How does PI work with deep trauma cases?

Clients working with a Psychologist or Psychiatrist who wants to work with a PI facilitator can get a lot of benefit from working with both.

PI is also effective in conjunction with qualified trauma councillors.

Does PI work with depression?

Yes, PI is effective when working in collaboration with a phycologists, psychiatrist or medical doctor.

MAP - Where are the facilitators based?

south-africa-map-with-Facilitator-buttons

Before and After

These photos were taken purely to illustrate shifts in the body structure after a PI session.  
You do not have to be naked in order to receive PI sessions.

Photo: Postural Integration - Fixing a posture - shoulder blades and rotated arms falling into alignment.jpg

Photo above: Example of shoulder blades and rotated arms falling into alignment.  Some tension in the buttocks has been released.

Photo: Postural Integration improved alignment in his Kyphosis.jpg

Photo above: An improved alignment in his Kyphosis in which the weight bearing point has been moved from the hips to the legs. Feeling “burdened”, “heavy” and “indecisive” before treatment, this client tapped into his own inner strength and support system.

The Process

  • Client and facilitator check in

    1. Client and facilitator "check in".

  • Facilitator guides client to translate their own body sensations

    2. Facilitator guides client to translate their own body sensations

  • Expanding body awareness

    3. Expanding body awareness

  • Using breath to prepare the body for deep tissue work

    4. Using breath to prepare the body for deep tissue work

  • Creating connections and facilitating self-exploration

    5. Creating connections and facilitating self-exploration

  • Opening superficial fascia around the collarbone / clavicle

    6. Opening superficial fascia around the collarbone / clavicle

  • Working on the gastrocnemius and deeper calf muscles

    7. Working on the gastrocnemius and deeper calf muscles

  • Opening up around the achilles tendon into the heel

    8. Opening up around the achilles tendon into the heel

  • Supporting a more mobile availability of the back of the shoulders and the back ribcage by working with the rhomboids, sub scapularis and supporting a better range of movement of the ribs and intercostal muscles under the scapula

    9. Supporting a more mobile availability of the back of the shoulders and the back ribcage

  • The facilitator is working along a part of the pectoral major origin at the sternum with the support of the client’s participation and expression

    10. The facilitator is working along a part of the pectoral major origin at the sternum

  • Neck roll: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

    11. Neck roll: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

  • Shoulder release: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

    12. Shoulder release: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

  • The end of a session: supporting the client’s integration of deep tissue release work into a deeper and developing body-mind awareness

    13. Back roll: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

  • Completing the session with quiet time and soft energy work

    14. The end of a session: supporting the client’s integration of deep tissue release work


The Process in 14 steps

1. Client and facilitator "check in"

2. Facilitator guides client to translate their own sensations

3. Expanding body awareness

4. Using breath to prepare the body for deep tissue work

5. Creating connections and facilitating self-exploration

6. Opening superficial fascia around the collarbone / clavicle as an example of some of the strokes that can be expected in a session

7. Working on the gastrocnemius and deeper calf muscles including the soleus, peroneus longus, popliteus and tibialis posterior as an example of some of the strokes that can be expected in a session

8. Opening up around the achilles tendon into the heel as an example of some of the strokes that can be expected in a session

9. Supporting a more mobile availability of the back of the shoulders and the back ribcage by working with the rhomboids, sub scapularis and supporting a better range of movement of the ribs and intercostal muscles under the scapula as an example of some of the strokes that can be expected in a session

10. The facilitator is working along a part of the pectoral major origin at the sternum with the support of the client’s participation and expression as an example of some of the strokes that can be expected in a session

11. Neck roll: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

12. Shoulder release: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

13. Back roll: each session is completed with a neck roll, shoulder release and back roll

14. The end of a session: supporting the client’s integration of deep tissue release work into a deeper and developing body-mind awareness

Training as a PI Facilitator in South Africa

Please contact Jonathan Atkinson for training information: jonathanatkinson7@gmail.com

Meet the Facilitators

  • Stephne Fain  Postural Integration

Stephne Fain

Postural Integration Facilitator
Rustenburg, North West, South Africa

  • Leonie Mare Postural Integration

Leonie Maré

Postural Integration Facilitator
Howick, KwaZulu Natal, South Africa

  • Hannelore-Kunze-Postural-Integration

Hannelore Kunze

Postural Integration Facilitator
Jeffreys Bay, Eastern Cape, South Africa

  • Jonathan-Atkinson-Postural-Integration

Jonathan Atkinson

Postural Integration Facilitator
Woodmead, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa

  • Jonathan-Atkinson-Postural-Integration

Jacqueline Wijtenburg-Anaxagoras

Postural Integration Facilitator
Komani (former Queenstown), Eastern Cape, South Africa

  • Rashnee Atkinson Postural Integration

Rashnee Atkinson

Postural Integration Facilitator
Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa

  • Corle-Greyling-Postural-Integration

Corlé Greyling

Postural Integration Facilitator
Lonehill, Johannesburg, Gauteng, South Africa

  • Daniel Hofinger Postural Integration Cape Town

Daniel Hofinger

Postural Integration Facilitator
Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa

  • Dr. Claire Meekel-Stevens Postural Integration Burlington, Canada

Claire Meekel-Stevens

Postural Integration Facilitator
Burlington, Ontario, Canada

  • Tania Serfontein Postural Integration Sydney, Australia

Tania Serfontein

Postural Integration Facilitator
Sydney, Australia

Contact us